About

About

Marc Brüseke is a South African academic, writer, guerrilla publisher, and artist of mixed ancestry from Cape Town. He recently completed a PhD in English Literature and Creative Writing. His research centres on creative non-fiction—specifically life writing. He's used the ideas of Walter Benjamin[1] and Roland Barthes[2] to craft a practical approach to life writing—an approach that leans into fragmentation as a narrative tool. He's presented a conference paper and delivered three talks in this field. He teaches English Literature, Creative Writing, and Media & Film. He holds an MA in Sociology and Global Change from Manchester Metropolitan University and a BA (Hons) in Media and Communication from York St. John University. He founded Analog Submission Press, a guerrilla-style small press focused on short-run poetry and prose publications. He’s edited, designed, and typeset over 160 publications to date. He's authored ten pamphlets and three books. His artwork has been showcased in four solo exhibitions. He lives in Yorkshire, England. You can connect with him on Instagram.


  1. Walter Benjamin (1892–1940) was a German philosopher and cultural critic. He is best known for his essay The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, in which he discusses the impact of mass reproduction on art's ‘aura.’ Benjamin committed suicide while fleeing the Nazis during World War II. His work gained posthumous acclaim and significantly influenced critical theory today. ↩︎

  2. Roland Barthes (1915–1980) was a French philosopher and literary theorist prominent in structuralism and post-structuralism. Known for his works Death of the Author and Camera Lucida, Barthes explored the role of language, signs, and reader interpretation in text. His ideas have had a lasting impact on cultural studies, literature, and philosophy. ↩︎